Friday, February 26, 2016

Many of Our Grandchildren Are Going To Die, Any Day Now


Great Earthquakes of the Pacific Northwest & Western Canada
Suggested by: CWU – CentralWashU - Central Washington University A Natural Obsession
It is well worth your time to watch this.
If you have interrupted reception, it may be because your internet speed is lower than my original post. To correct, once the video is started, click on gear icon (show at the bottom of the video, and lower the resolution. I, and many others have begun photographing and videographing in HD - High Definition 1080p (pixels) and higher; but you can view in as low as 144p for viewing.
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(1:04:00 minutes YouTube Video, it's quite long: being 1 hour and four minutes)

Published on Feb 16, 2016 
Central Washington University geology professor Nick Zentner presents “Great Earthquakes of the Pacific Northwest”.
Field data discussed includes Brian Atwater’s buried soils onshore, Chris Goldfinger’s turbidites offshore, and CWU Geology’s PANGA data from GPS receivers from across the Pacific Northwest. 250 folks attended the lecture at the Hal Holmes Center in downtown, Ellensburg, Washington. February 10, 2016.
Engineering
 
If you have interrupted reception, it may be because your internet speed is lower than my original post. To correct, once the video is started, click on gear icon (show at the bottom of the video, and lower the resolution. I, and many others have begun photographing and videographing in HD - High Definition 1080p (pixels) and higher; but you can view in as low as 144p for viewing.
>> Sound On >> Best viewed Full Screen >> Darkened Room

Because earthquake magnitudes are measured on a logarithmic scale, there is a thirty times (30x) increase in the amount of energy released in an earthquake of magnitude 7.0 to magnitude 8.0. There is a thirty times (30x) increase in the energy released in an earthquake of magnitude 8.0 to magnitude 9.0. So, there is a 30x30; a 900 times times increase in the amount of energy released in an earthquake of magnitude 7.0 to magnitude 9.0.

Albeit this discussion is very United States, America-centric, discussing the U.S. Pacific Northwest: Washington State, Oregon and Northern California, that very same Cascadia Subduction Zone continues up into British Columbia to Nootka Fault, about half way up Vancouver Island. Just north of that Nootka Fault is another Subduction Zone, caused by the Explorer Plate Subducting under the North American Plate; and, even further north the Pacific Plate Subducts directly under the North American Plate, at the Queen Charlotte Fault (soon to be renamed the Haida Gwaii Fault).

Seismicity of Canada (corrected hyperlink Natural Resources Canada – Earthquakes . Earthquakes Canada:

Seismologists locate an average of 1,500 earthquakes each year in Canada. Only about 100 of these measure more than magnitude 3 on the Richter scale or are felt by humans. Earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater are strong enough to cause a significant damage. Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) is a Natural Resources Canada agency with a mandate to study and record earthquakes in Canada. The text and the figures presented in this section are a modified version of the material presented at the GSC's web site. For more information on seismic hazard in Canada and British Columbia refer to the (corrected hyperlink) Natural Resources Canada – Earthquakes . Earthquakes Canada: for recent earthquakes reports, with magnitude and location ...” ~ British Columbia Institute of Technology, Department of Civil Engineering


For an artists interpretation of all of this see: Icelandic native, Björk, provides an artists interpretation of plate tectonics : Björk Icelandic pronunciation: [ˈpjœr̥k ˈkvʏðmʏntsˌtoʊhtɪr] - Mutual Core - Tectonic Plates, Chords

Knowing that this topic is very scary for many people, that does not mean we should look away. My old Boy Cub training was all about being prepared. Over the next while I hope that I can help you do just that.

Please make certain to voice your comments, concerns, recommendations and suggestions in the comment section, at the bottom of each post.